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Gender Roles in Islam

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Being Queer and Muslim brings up a lot of challenges to Islam, above and beyond the obvious perceived sinfulness of homosexuality.

But there are so many gendered aspects of the religion. Even if the story of Lut can be interpreted to not condemn homosexuality, what about how Islamic rulings on marriage and how they'd relate to gay marriage? Do "male" roles and "female" roles turn into "masculine" and "feminine" roles?

This doesn't even begin to touch the subject of being transgender(ed) or genderqueer.

Is Islam meant to be a really gendered religion, and should we make those gender roles queer friendly or try to eliminate them?

Questions to keep a mind up at night.

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  • they really are. i posted a similar post asking about islam's view on homosexuality . it's all very confusing . maybe u should make a salat 2isti5ara if u rlly want to know. i considered it before , but i dont rlly pray anymre , i feel i've lost my relationship with god and i dont really feel that connection to god i used to before hitting puberty . if u dont mind me asking , but which role would u play if u were in a relationship ? i considered once that what if u have girls and one is feminin and one is masculin , they both pray , they do everything in the quran , would they go to heaven ? my guess is maybe , if u have a good heart , u are rlly doing the main thing got obliges u to do , then wjy would u not go to heaven ? i know this is rlly not a response as much as it is more answerless questions ! lol

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      Anonymous
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      Why peopl still believe in this imaginary creature ?? Who care what Islam say about homosexuality ?

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    • 17-24_f_w_h1_f4
      Comment

      To you it might be an imaginary creature but a lot of people believe in God (I personally have my own views of the term God). I think it is offensive to address Islam or any other religion this way even if you don't believe in it. Just like you demand respect from others and want them to let you live as you please, you should return this respect.

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  • at the beginning i meant they rlly do* , as in they rlly do keep u up all night . :)

    Reply to PurplenBlack
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    Advice

    The difference between whether or not you are biologically one sex or another (which I personally see as being defined by the existence or lack thereof of a Y chromosome, not whether or not you have breasts as a man or an enlarged phallic-appearing clitoris as a woman, for instance) does not necessarily determine the correctness of gender paradigms, such as correct toilet seat position.

    As for gender roles in Islam, such as whether you should wear hijab and whether you give or receive dowry, likewise I have yet to see an indication in any Islamic scripture, Quranic or otherwise, that individuals with a cross-gender personality are considered members of that alternate gender for purposes of gender roles in Islamic law.

    My personal perspective is, thus, that if you are determining which gender role within Islam you should uphold, that should be determined by your biology, i.e. your chromosomes. If you do not believe in Islam, then obviously you have no cause to adhere to this, aside from social pressures.

    Reply to Peter
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  • 17-24_f_b_h1_f3
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    I don't quite understand your point here. Could you elaborate?

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  • 25-34_f_w_h2_f2
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    What he means is is that gender and sex are two different things. Gender is what sex you identify yourself as what how you think psychologically, sex is what you are born as physically. The two things are not always exclusively related to one another.

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  • 17-24_f_b_h1_f3
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    No, I am very much aware that sex and gender are two separate things. I'm just confused by Peter's distinction of them. I think he's trying to say that despite a person's self-initiated hormonal transition, the sex that they were assigned at birth is what is important. I also don't understand what a toilet seat has to do with gender paradigms. There's a difference between acknowledging physical needs of how a body has to work (like with peeing) and having that dictate a gender paradigm.

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  • 25-34_f_w_h2_f2
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    No, he's merely pointing out that they are two different things. That is all. Also the toilet seat comment was just an example to illustrate his point on their relation to one-another.

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  • 17-24_f_b_h1_f3
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    Really? You don't think there's room within progressive Islam to reanalyze gender roles? Shouldn't a transwoman wear hijab if she agrees with the religious philosophy behind it? And shouldn't a transman give dowry if he chooses to islamically marry a woman he loves?

    Hell, what if two Muslim women in a relationship want to follow the guidelines of Islam on this issue? Is it based on who makes more money, on who is stronger physically, on what?

    Of course, that's not to say gender roles in Islam don't have to be reformed first, and reanalyzed from a feminist progressive view.

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  • 17-24_f_b_h1_f3
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    Looking back, I guess I didn't clarify my above post. I believe in one God and that Muhammad was his messenger. I am culturally a Muslim. I believe in the basic Muslim tenets. Why, then, shouldn't I be free to reanalyze something that is usually as basic as gender roles in Islam? No matter how controversial, I don't know why those gender roles should only be made to suit the lives of "mainstream" Muslims, even though I believe too. This is more a debate on taking back Islam, regardless of how many people in the mainstream agree with that.

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