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Moral Position vs. Homophobia

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I am curious, when you encounter a person with a moral or social position against homosexuality (either those who consider it something a person has choice in or those who consider it an urge that should not be indulged) do you tend to automatically get the impression of 'homophobia'?

Perhaps a semantic question is in order: do you feel you have the same definition of homophobia as most others?

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  • 17-24_f_w_h2_f1
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    I understand that there are people who are against homosexuality because of religion or society or just personal beliefs. But, for me, homophobia is when they don't live and let live. They ignore the fact that gays are human too and should be treated with respect. So if my friends are making derogatory remarks or jokes about homosexuals, they're homophobic. When my mother says that homosexuals are disgusting, she's homophobic. What I'm trying to say is, when there is no room for tolerance for homosexuals, that's homophobia for me.

    Reply to Edel
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    Yes, I get the impression that person is homophobic. Being homophobic has a very simple definition: no acceptance of gays. Now, I cannot distinguish between moral, or religious, or whatever reason they may have, they are homophobic in my mind. And should get educated.

    Reply to MirAmin
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  • 17-24_m_w_h1_f4
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    Interesting question. Homophobia for me is unjustified fear or hate of homosexuals, but I don't think that kind of hate can be justified in the first place. Even for people with certain religious affiliations, homophobia shouldn't be justified, because by definition, it opposes the message of the 'almighty good' as it promotes hate and violence. I think in the end, with anything, people should allow themselves to think instead of obeying social or religious obligations blindly. Nothing can justify the consequences of homophobia.

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    But again, I have not mentioned hate or violence. In fact, I have only mentioned the opinion. The question is actually if that hate, violence, fear, etc. is assumed.

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  • There is no such thing as moral position against or for homophobia. Morality is subjective. At the same time, if you are a homophobe because of some kind of moral reason then question I have to ask is, is hate part of your morality?

    PS: homophobe on Windows isn't considered as a word. I am glad a homophobe works at MS or it's a pretty awesome coincidence.

    Reply to lalithmuthali
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    So your belief on this is that their position on the matter, regardless of their reasoning, is inherently one of ignorance, and however it may manifest itself, inherently constitutes a phobia?

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  • 25-34_f_b_h2_f3
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    I don't get the impression they are homophobic. Especially because they are conducive to learning someone else's point of view and discussing their own. A homophobic person would be someone who cannot discuss the situation altogether- and continues denying the other person's reasoning through interruption and resistance to open discussion. But I do think they deny obvious real desires that other humans have, which they don't necessarily possess- which can always put the homosexual person in a terrible position where they are always confined and not fully living- so the fact that they are willing to discuss their opinion, although in a biased manner, makes them feel that they are normal and that's why they can make those judgments even if it belittles a human being's dignity and existence. I think. Especially since a homosexual more often than not will lose the argument of saying: "heterosexual intimacy should be avoided and has no meaning". There's power distance then between heterosexual opinions and homosexual opinions, making the whole coming out thing extremely dramatic.

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    Rather loaded that question, didn't we?

    My religion teaches that the practice of having homosexual sex is not allowed. It says nothing whatsoever about hating or harassing or denigrating people with the condition of homosexual attraction. In fact, those things are forbidden in even stronger and more explicit terms.

    Religions forbid all sorts of practices: drinking alcohol, eating pork and shellfish, working on a certain day of the week, cutting your beard, swearing...but most of these things you do not assume hate or label a phobia unconditionally. To do so here is a prejudice of association, you're assuming things about me, someone you don't know and have never met, based on your opinions of the actions of others.

    But I understand that. It's an easy assumption to make, which is why I asked the question in the first place.

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  • 17-24_f_w_h3_f4
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    But I think your definition is faulty here. There are many who accept gayness yet they are homophobic, unconsciously so at times. Accepting does not necessarily mean someone is not homophobic. My friend accepts me, yet he's undeniably bi-phobic, and this is caused by ignorance, more than anything else.

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